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Deadly Coronavirus discovered in Chicago, Washington State

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The deadly Coronavirus has touched American soil, despite rigorous screening of passengers on planes enroute from China’s airports. First discovered in Washington State, and now a confirmed case in Chicago, Illinois. A suspected case has been discovered in Texas as well.

UPDATE 1/27/2020:

Mayor of Wuhan: 5 million people left Wuhan China before the quarantine was activated to contain the virus. Incubation period of up to 2 weeks

From Click2houston.com:

COLLEGE STATION, Texas – Officials at the Brazos County Health District said Thursday they are investigating a suspected case of the 2019 novel coronavirus.

The male patient, who has been identified as a student at Texas A&M University, had traveled from Wuhan, China, where the coronavirus that has made headlines in recent days first originated, officials said.

In the video above, the woman claims dead bodies are being left unattended so the doctors can treat other patients.

Global map of infected:

From the CDC:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is closely monitoring an outbreak of respiratory illness caused by a novel (new) coronavirus first identified in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. Chinese authorities identified the new coronavirus, which has resulted in hundreds of confirmed cases in China, including cases outside Wuhan, with additional cases being identified in a growing number of countries internationally. The first case in the United States was announced on January 21, 2020. There are ongoing investigations to learn more.

CDC:

Second Travel-related Case of 2019 Novel Coronavirus Detected in United States

Press Release

For Immediate Release: Friday, January 24, 2020
Contact: Media Relations
(404) 639-3286

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) today confirmed the second infection with 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) in the United States has been detected in Illinois. The patient recently returned from Wuhan, China, where an outbreak of respiratory illness caused by this novel coronavirus has been ongoing since December 2019.

The patient returned to the U.S. from Wuhan on January 13, 2020, and called a health care provider after experiencing symptoms a few days later.  The patient was admitted to a hospital, where infection control measures were taken to reduce the risk of transmission to other individuals. The patient remains hospitalized in an isolation room in stable condition and is doing well.

Based on the patient’s travel history and symptoms, health care professionals suspected 2019-nCoV. A clinical specimen was collected and sent to CDC, where laboratory testing confirmed the infection. The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) and the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) are investigating locations where this patient went after returning to Illinois and are identifying any close contacts who were possibly exposed.  The patient has limited close contacts, all of whom are currently well and who will be monitored for symptoms. Since returning from China, the patient has had very limited movement outside the home.

CDC is taking aggressive public health measures to help protect the health of Americans.  While CDC considers this a serious public health threat, based on current information, the immediate health risk from 2019-nCoV to the general American public is considered low at this time.  CDC is working closely with the Illinois Department of Public Health, the Chicago Department of Public Health, and other local partners. A CDC team has been deployed to support the ongoing investigation.

However, CDC has been proactively preparing for the introduction of 2019-nCoV in the U.S. for weeks, including:

  • First alerting clinicians on January 8 to be on the look-out for patients with respiratory symptoms and a history of travel to Wuhan, China.
  • Developing guidance for clinicians for testing and management of 2019-nCoV, as well as guidance for home care of patients with 2019-nCoV.
  • Has developed a diagnostic test to detect this virus in clinical specimens. Currently, testing must take place at CDC, but CDC is preparing to share these test kits with domestic and international partners.
  • Implementing public health entry screening at Atlanta (ATL), Chicago (ORD), Los Angeles (LAX), New York (JFK), and San Francisco (SFO) airports.  CDC is currently evaluating the extent and duration of this enhanced screening.
  • CDC has activated its Emergency Operations Center to better provide ongoing support.

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses, some causing respiratory illness in people and others circulating among animals including camels, cats and bats. Rarely, animal coronaviruses can evolve and infect people and then spread between people, such as has been seen with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS). Investigations are ongoing to learn more, but person-to-person spread of 2019-nCoV is occurring.

It is likely there will be more cases reported in the U.S. in the coming days and weeks. CDC will continue to update the public as circumstances warrant.  While the immediate risk of this new virus to the American public is believed to be low at this time, there are simple daily precautions that everyone should always take.  It is currently flu and respiratory disease season, and CDC recommends getting vaccinated, taking everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs, and taking flu antivirals if prescribed.  Right now, CDC recommends travelers avoid all nonessential travel to Wuhan, China. In addition, CDC recommends people traveling to China practice certain health precautions like avoiding contact with people who are sick and practicing good hand hygiene.

For more information about the current outbreak in China, visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html. For travel health information, visit https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices/watch/pneumonia-china.

Updated January 23, 2020

Situation Summary

CDC is closely monitoring an outbreak of respiratory illness caused by a novel (new) coronavirus (termed “2019-nCoV”) that was first detected in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China and which continues to expand. Chinese health officials have reported hundreds of infections with 2019-nCoV in China, including outside of Hubei Province. Infections with 2019-nCoV also are being reported in a growing number of countries internationally, including the United States, where the first 2019-nCoV infection was detected in a traveler returning from Wuhan on January 21, 2020.

Chinese health authorities were the first to post the full genome of the 2019-nCoV in GenBankexternal icon, the NIH genetic sequence database, and in the Global Initiative on Sharing All Influenza Data (GISAIDexternal icon) portal, an action which has facilitated detection of this virus.

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses, some causing illness in people and others that circulate among animals, including camels, cats and bats. Rarely, animal coronaviruses can evolve and infect people and then spread between people such as has been seen with MERS and SARS.

When person-to-person spread has occurred with MERS and SARS, it is thought to have happened via respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes, similar to how influenza and other respiratory pathogens spread. Spread of MERS and SARS between people has generally occurred between close contacts. Past MERS and SARS outbreaks have been complex, requiring comprehensive public health responses.

Early on, many of the patients in the outbreak in Wuhan, China reportedly had some link to a large seafood and animal market, suggesting animal-to-person spread. However, a growing number of patients reportedly have not had exposure to animal markets, suggesting person-to-person spread is occurring. At this time, it’s unclear how easily or sustainably this virus is spreading between people.

Both MERS and SARS have been known to cause severe illness in people. The situation with regard to 2019-nCoV is still unclear. While severe illness, including illness resulting in a number of deaths has been reported in China, other patients have had milder illness and been discharged.

There are ongoing investigations to learn more. This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.On This Page

World map of coronavirus outbreaks.

View larger image

Risk Assessment

Outbreaks of novel virus infections among people are always of public health concern. The risk from these outbreaks depends on characteristics of the virus, including whether and how well it spreads between people, the severity of resulting illness, and the medical or other measures available to control the impact of the virus (for example, vaccine or treatment medications).

Investigations are ongoing to learn more, but person-to-person spread of 2019-nCoV is occurring. It’s important to note that person-to-person spread can happen on a continuum. Some viruses are highly contagious (like measles), while other viruses are less so. It’s not clear yet how easily 2019-nCoV spreads from person-to-person. It’s important to know this in order to better assess the risk posed by this virus. While CDC considers this is a very serious public health threat, based on current information, the immediate health risk from 2019-nCoV to the general American public is considered low at this time. Nevertheless, CDC is taking proactive preparedness precautions.

What to Expect

More cases are likely to be identified in the coming days, including more cases in the United States. Given what has occurred previously with MERS and SARS, it’s likely that some person-to-person spread will continue to occur.

CDC Response

  • CDC is closely monitoring this situation and is working with WHO.
  • CDC established a 2019-nCoV Incident Management Structure on January 7, 2020. On January 21, 2020, CDC activated its Emergency Response System to better provide ongoing support to the 2019-nCoV response.
  • On January 23, 2020, CDC again raised its travel alert for the coronavirus outbreak. The travel notice for Wuhan City was raised from Level 2: Practice Enhanced Precautions to Level 3: Avoid Nonessential Travel. CDC also issued a Level 1: Practice Usual Precautions for the rest of China.
  • CDC also is conducting entry screening of passengers on direct and connecting flights from Wuhan, China to five major airports: Atlanta (ATL), Chicago (ORD), Los Angeles, (LAX) New York city (JFK), and San Francisco (SFO).
  • CDC issued an updated interim Health Alert Notice (HAN) Advisory to inform state and local health departments and health care providers about this outbreak on January 17, 2020.
  • A CDC team has been deployed to support the ongoing investigation in the state of Washington in response to the first reported case of 2019-nCoV in the United States, including potentially tracing close contacts to determine if anyone else has become ill.
  • CDC has developed a real time Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (rRT-PCR) test that can diagnose 2019-nCoV. Currently, testing for this virus must take place at CDC, but in the coming days and weeks, CDC will share these tests with domestic and international partners through the agency’s International Reagent Resourceexternal icon.
  • CDC also is sequencing the entire genome of the virus from the first reported case in the United States and plans to upload the sequence to GenBank and GISAID when completed.
  • CDC also is growing the virus in cell culture, which is necessary for further studies, including for additional genetic characterization.

Other Available Resources

The following resources are available with information on 2019-nCoV

From medicalexpress.com:

China

As of Thursday, more than 570 people have been infected across China, most of them in Wuhan.

Hong Kong and British scientists have estimated that between 1,300 and 1,700 people in the city may have been infected.

— The city of Macau, a gambling hub hugely popular with mainland tourists, has confirmed two cases. The first was a 52-year-old businesswoman from Wuhan who arrived in Macau by high-speed rail on Sunday, via the neighbouring city of Zhuhai.

— Hong Kong

As of Thursday, two people have tested positive in Hong Kong. Both had visited Wuhan in recent days and are being treated on isolation wards in hospital.

Japan

On January 16, Japan’s health ministry confirmed its first case—a man who had visited Wuhan and was hospitalised on January 10, four days after his return to Japan.

Singapore

Singapore on Thursday confirmed its first case—a 66-year-old man from Wuhan who arrived in Singapore with his family on Monday.

South Korea

South Korea reported its first case on January 20—a 35-year-old woman who flew in from Wuhan.

Taiwan

On January 22, the self-ruled island of Taiwan, authorities confirmed a first case—a Taiwanese woman in her fifties, living in Wuhan, who returned to the island on Monday with symptoms including fever, coughing and a sore throat.

Thailand

Thailand has detected two cases—a 74-year-old Chinese woman, who is being treated at hospital after presenting with symptoms at Thailand’s biggest airport Suvarnabhumi on January 13.

On January 8, a Chinese traveller was diagnosed with mild pneumonia that was later confirmed to have been caused by the coronavirus.

United States

On January 21, the United States announced its first case—a man in his 30s living near Seattle. Officials say he is in a good condition and approached authorities himself after reading about the virus in news reports.

Vietnam

Two cases have been confirmed so far in Vietnam—a Chinese man living in Ho Chi Minh City, who was infected by his father who travelled to Vietnam on January 13 from the Chinese city of Wuhan.

New York Times:

The official death toll from the mysterious coronavirus increased by more than a half-dozen in 24 hours, to 26, while the number of confirmed cases jumped by more than 200 .

Mortality rate:

We don’t entirely know yet, and we won’t know until more data comes in. Seventeen deaths out of 555 cases would mean a 3 percent mortality rate. That’s a little more than the estimated 2.5 percent mortality rate caused by the Spanish Flu in 1918, the last time the world faced a truly disastrous global pandemic. But it’s nowhere near as deadly as diseases like the bubonic plague, hantavirus, Marburg or Ebola.

UPDATE: Death toll rises to 41. Sickens 1200. They are currently monitoring 63 “patients under investigation” in the U.S. https://www.foxnews.com/health/coronavirus-death-toll-rises-in-china

From Fox News:

The death toll from the coronavirus that began in China and has since spread to several other countries, including the United States, rose to 41 while the number of confirmed cases in China increased to over 1,200, authorities said Saturday.

The uptick comes as China expands its unprecedented lockdown of 39 million people to contain the reach of the pneumonia-like virus.

Cases have been reported in 29 Chinese provinces, with 572 cases alone coming out of Wuhan, where the outbreak began, the South China Morning Post reported. Hubei, the province where Wuhan is located, saw 39 deaths as a result of infection, according to data released by local governments.

https://www.foxnews.com/health/coronavirus-death-toll-rises-in-china


Patent questions:

Answered: https://www.wusa9.com/video/news/verify/verify-coronavirus-patents-are-from-older-viruses-not-the-current-strain-video/507-626e80aa-2c38-4ba4-820e-7550c3900859

The term “coronavirus” is actually a classification for a bunch of viruses in the same family. It’s not the name for one specific virus. SARS, MERS, and the new virus “2019-nCoV” are all strains of a coronavirus.

The patents above and others like them were submitted by multiple governments and research groups to study vaccines and detection methods of past coronavirus strains.

Put simply, the patents are real, but they are about other coronaviruses, not the one that is currently spreading.

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/images/outbreak-coronavirus-world.png

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